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HUNTINGDON 101: The First Year Seminar; VOYAGES.
FYex 101: AGENDA
Lewis & Clark House, section of Dr. Jeremy Lewis.
Class Meeting Time: Mondays, 11:00-11:50 a.m. in Flowers Hall, Room 202.
Office Hours: Flowers 209, Phone ext. 4521.
by Jeremy Lewis, revised 10 Nov.  2004., with cultural events.
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  • Week 1, Session 1, M Aug. 23: Introduction to the Course, Discuss Syllabus
  • Week 2, Session 2, M Aug. 30: Life of Pi: Discussion, survival skills, etc.
  • Applying academic knowledge to survival.
  • The value of multicultural knowledge.
  • Awareness of comparative religion.
  • Week 3, Labor Day (No class session).
  • Week 4, Session 3, M Sept. 13: Academic Voyages: How to Study
  • Punctual and regular attendance.
  • Listening, note taking and review.
  • Study groups as part of social life.
  • Library skills.
  • Writing in structured way, preparing and organizing thoughts.
  • Communication with instructors (type of assignment, purpose, delays, absences.)
  • Course grade formula and rules awareness.
  • Steady regular study works much better than desperate midnight hours.
  • Week 5, Session 4, M Sept. 20: Personal and Social Voyages: Healthy Living
  • Attrition of freshmen due to distractions.
  • Adult living means making own choices.
  • Aristotle: Good man has good habits.
  • regular meals, sensible diet, 8 hours of sleep nightly.
  • Temptations to excess: alcohol, drugs, sexuality.
  • Optimize, don't maximize.
  • As adults, if questioning rules of morality, should focus on the damage done by excessive consumption. (Utilitarian ethics better than none?)
  • The point of banning substances is that they are harmful to the body.
  • Public health issues usually reinforce moral rules.
  • Social habits: Good reputation is all you have -- and it lasts for years.
  • In freshman months, unfair dating leads to bad reputation; fair behavior leads to better social repute.
  • Letting down your friends, breaking appointments -- send messages to your associates.
  • "Man is the sum of his acts." -- Jean-Paul Sartre.
  • Week 6, Session 5, M Sept. 27: Academic Voyages: Cheating and The Honor Code
  • (Bring student handbook to class).
  • Honor code is open ended: comply with academic and ethical principles.
  • trust & flexibility: e.g. leaving test for bathroom trip; make-up tests may be unsupervised.
  • brings equity: you, who work hard, know others don't get off cheap.
  • violating code is hated by students: J board students are claimed harsher than faculty.
  • self-responsibility for behavior and reporting violations.
  • requirement to confront others is sometimes the hardest.  It takes leadership.
  • Can you give examples where you have stood up for ethics in face of peer pressure?
  • Cheating: Surveys show US freshmen  no longer recognize cheating as evil.
  • Not just copying answers, which avoids learning.
  • Not just dishonest responses.
  • Observe rules on group work or individual projects.
  • Plagiarism is using others' work as your own.
  • Essays and short "think pieces" which do not need citations may have different rules from research papers.
  • Improper citation on a formal research paper may be taken as plagiarism.
  • When in doubt, check with instructor on the ground rules for the specific written project.
  • It is wise to build good credibility early, for it may carry you through difficulties later.
  • Off campus behavior counts also:
  • let's not embarrass our friends & college by public drunkenness, rudeness.
  • Week 7, Session 6, M Oct. 4: Academic Voyages: Time Management
  • The daily triangle is equilateral:
  • 8 hours work, 8 hours sports, play or cultural enhancement, 8 hours sleep.
  • Work only counts class, lab, reading, writing, problem solving.
  • Anything else comes out of the play category!
  • Be sure to "read around" your subjects on materials that are not required for any one class.
  • Cultural enhancement: try classical music, Shakespeare Theatre, dance, World Affairs Council, ISA banquet.
  • Take every chance you can to particpate and lead in HC major field clubs.
  • Three hours study on average needed for each hour of class time.
  • (includes heavy periods of study or writing, averaged with quiter periods.)
  • Sleeping short catches up with you in less than three weeks.
  • Pulling an all nighter catches up with you next day!
  • Sports -- even serious team commitments -- come out of play time, not out of study time.
  • Week 8, Session 7, M Oct. 11: Academic Voyages: Tutoring and Supplemental Instruction Resources
  • Most common needs are writing and math tutoring.
  • Study group may help each member by pooling skills.
  • Notes are useful -- when you actually review them.
  • Midnight cramming empties your brain.  Not a good idea before a test.
  • On a written project, put down your thoughts, plans and work up a bibliography early.
  • Writing to deadline for some people works well -- provided you laid the groundwork early.
  • In college, if not in all high schools, deadlines usually come with penalties.
  • Do try DVD programs -- and live language tables at lunch -- for languages and mathematics.
  • Practice makes perfect.
  • Week 9, Fall Break (No class session).
  • Week 10, Session 8, M Oct. 25: Huntingdon 101 Service Project
  • "Service before Self" -- Willliam of Wykeham.
  • "Ich Dien"(I serve, in German).  Motto of the Prince of Wales.
  • 98% of the good we do for others comes through professional skills, in family or in clubs & societies.
  • We rarely serve others by standing alone.
  • What kinds of service are there?
  • What does it mean to serve others?
  • Week 11, Session 9, M Nov. 1: Personal Voyages: Introduction to Values
  • Academic values are based on openness, learning and sharing.
  • Openness depends on trust that information will be used fairly.
  • Academic values uphold culture and learning over hedonism.
  • Academic values uphold truth even where it embarrasses or conflicts with power.
  • Academic freedom to research and speak -- implies tolerance for alternative views
  • Week 12, Session 10, M Nov. 8: Academic Voyages: The College Catalog
  • Selecting and Scheduling Courses
  • Read carefully the requirements of core and major fields, keep checklists.
  • Top priority: required courses in Core and in major fields.
  • Second priority: electives in core and in major fields.
  • List Alternate courses: to allow for time conflicts and closed courses, select four alternates.
  • Take your paperwork with you to advisor's office.
  • Keep appointments, especially if outside normal office hours.
  • Intervene early in event of problems: talk to your instructors and advisor.
  • Admit mistakes honestly, and plan to fix 'em.
  • Week 13, Session 11, M Nov. 15: VOYAGE #2: Personal and Social Voyages.
  • Attendance at and participation in a required cultural event
  • How do cultural events develop our minds, our character?
  • How do we find meaning in life outside of work?
  • What does it entail to be an educated, civilized person?
  • What distinctions should we make between highbrow and popular culture?
  • To what degree do we need to learn about foreign cultures to understand our own?
  • You are required to attend one of the following cultural events this week: (Attendance will be recorded.)
  • Week 14, Session 12, M Nov. 22: Personal Voyages: Transitions-Going Home
  • Mature way to return home:
  • clean clothes, well organized, modest, respectful.
  • just more knowledgeable and grown up.
  • rebellion against parents is immature.
  • you're living independently at college; be responsible at home.
  • Self-Evaluation: open envelopes with writing from the first class on your expectations, hopes, and dreams
  • Self knowledge is a key to maturity.
  • Do your first dreams look practical to you at this stage of the term?
  • Did you meet your goals: academic, extra-curricular cultural activities, social?
  • VOYAGE #3: "Hometown Heroes Program"
  • Do you have role models from home that helped you become what you are?
  • Coach, teacher, family member, friend, minister?
  • Are there a few people who can inspire many others to excel?
  • Are there some younger associates from home who you hope to inspire to go away to college?